Docker Hub – The world’s leading container content library and ecosystem

The World’s Largest Community of Container Images

Docker Hub is the world’s largest repository of container images with an array of content sources including container community developers, open source projects and independent software vendors (ISV) building and distributing their code in containers. Users get access to free public repositories for storing and sharing images or can choose subscription plan for private repos.

For Developers: Store and share your personal projects and see what the container community is building.

For Teams: Leverage private repositories to restrict content to specific users or teams.

For ISVs: List and distribute your software and plugins as containers and reach the millions of end users of the container community.

For Enterprises: Choose certified containers from validated ISVs with cooperative support so you have the assurance to run in your production environment.

It provides the following major features:

  • Repositories: Push and pull container images.
  • Teams & Organizations: Manage access to private repositories of container images.
  • Official Images: Pull and use high-quality container images provided by Docker.
  • Publisher Images: Pull and use high-quality container images provided by external vendors. Certified images also include support and guarantee compatibility with Docker Enterprise.
  • Builds: Automatically build container images from GitHub and Bitbucket and push them to Docker Hub
  • Webhooks: Trigger actions after a successful push to a repository to integrate Docker Hub with other services.

In Docker, everything is based on Images. An image is a combination of a file system and parameters. Let’s take an example of the following command in Docker.

docker run hello-world 
  • The Docker command is specific and tells the Docker program on the Operating System that something needs to be done.
  • The run command is used to mention that we want to create an instance of an image, which is then called a container.
  • Finally, “hello-world” represents the image from which the container is made.

Docker Hub Quickstart

Visit This : https://docs.docker.com/docker-hub/

What is Containers?

A container is a standard unit of software that packages up code and all its dependencies so the application runs quickly and reliably from one computing environment to another. A Docker container image is a lightweight, standalone, executable package of software that includes everything needed to run an application: code, runtime, system tools, system libraries and settings.

Container images become containers at runtime and in the case of Docker containers – images become containers when they run on Docker Engine. Available for both Linux and Windows-based applications, containerized software will always run the same, regardless of the infrastructure. Containers isolate software from its environment and ensure that it works uniformly despite differences for instance between development and staging.

Docker containers that run on Docker Engine:

  • Standard: Docker created the industry standard for containers, so they could be portable anywhere
  • Lightweight: Containers share the machine’s OS system kernel and therefore do not require an OS per application, driving higher server efficiencies and reducing server and licensing costs
  • Secure: Applications are safer in containers and Docker provides the strongest default isolation capabilities in the industry

CONTAINERS VS VIRTUAL MACHINES

Containers are an abstraction at the app layer that packages code and dependencies together. Multiple containers can run on the same machine and share the OS kernel with other containers, each running as isolated processes in user space. Containers take up less space than VMs (container images are typically tens of MBs in size), can handle more applications and require fewer VMs and Operating systems.

Virtual machines (VMs) are an abstraction of physical hardware turning one server into many servers. The hypervisor allows multiple VMs to run on a single machine. Each VM includes a full copy of an operating system, the application, necessary binaries and libraries – taking up tens of GBs. VMs can also be slow to boot.

CONTAINERS VS VIRTUAL MACHINES

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Harshvardhan Mishra

I am an IoT (Internet of Things) Enthusiast and Blogging is my Passion. Follow and send tweets me on @harshvardhanrvm

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